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food allergy

Food Allergies in Children

What is a food allergy?

A food allergy is an abnormal response of the body to a certain food. It is important to know that this is different than a food intolerance, which does not affect the immune system, although some of the same symptoms may be present. Read more

10 Steps to Help Prevent SIDS

10 Steps to Help Prevent SIDS

Parents who know about SIDS may think of it as their worst nightmare. Sudden infant death syndrome is known as SIDS or crib death. It’s when a baby 12 months or younger dies during sleep with no warning signs or a clear reason.

Before your worries keep you from sleeping at night, know that although there is no 100% way to prevent SIDS, there is a lot you can do lower your baby’s risk. Since parents widely began following the steps below, the SIDS rate in the United States has dropped more than 50%. Read more

eczema

Eczema

Eczema is a common skin condition that usually begins before your baby is 12 months old. The affected skin is dry, red, and itchy. Sometimes these areas of skin can become cracked, weepy and then scab over.

Eczema can be well controlled and there are ways you can help your child feel more comfortable. For many children, appropriate skin care and cortisone treatment will need to be continued for many years.

Eczema is not contagious. Read more

dry skin

Dry Skin

What’s making my child’s skin so dry?

Babies and children can get dry skin just like adults do. In fact, because young skin is more delicate, it’s more susceptible to becoming dry.

Cold, dry outdoor air and indoor heating can rob skin of its natural moisture in the winter. And if your child is prone to dry skin, he’ll break out in dry patches in the summer as well, because the summer sun, air conditioning, salt water, and the chlorine in pool water can all be drying. Read more

superfood

15 Kid and Toddler Superfoods

It’s a fact of life: Chips, cupcakes and lots of other not-so-nutritionally-noble foods are going to find their way into your child’s mouth. Heck, if left to their own devices, a lot of kids wouldn’t eat anything that didn’t come out of a pizza or pasta box. But that’s all the more reason to make sure the meals you serve up are packed with as much good stuff as possible. Parenting went to Rachel Beller, R.D., founder of the Beller Nutritional Institute in Beverly Hills, CA, a mom of four and an expert in eating for disease prevention, to get her top picks of true bite-for-bite nutritional powerhouses. Most important, they’re also foods kids might actually eat. Add them to this week’s shopping list!

Eggs
Eggs offer protein, and they’re one of the few foods that naturally contain vitamin D, which helps the body absorb calcium. Eating protein at breakfast helps kids feel satisfied longer (no mid-morning hunger pangs). Read more

braces

The Basics of Braces

Some kids can’t wait to get their braces, seeing them as a sign that their teen years can’t be far behind. Others, though, worry about what they’ll feel or look like.

However your child feels, you probably have some questions and concerns of your own about braces (including how you’re going to pay for them!). Here’s the lowdown on kids and braces.

Why Kids Need Braces

Kids can need braces for any number of reasons, including crooked, overlapping, or overcrowded teeth, or a “bad bite” (known as malocclusion). Malocclusion is when there’s a difference in the sizes of the top and bottom jaws. When the upper jaw is bigger than the lower jaw, it’s called an overbite. When the lower jaw is bigger, it’s called an underbite.

Sometimes tooth and jaw problems can be caused by tooth decay, losing baby teeth too soon, accidents, or habits like thumb sucking. But often they’re inherited, so if you or someone in your family needed braces, it’s likely that your kids will, too.

Often, your child’s dentist will be the first to notice problems during a regular visit and recommend that you see an orthodontist (a dentist who specializes in correcting jaw and/or teeth alignment problems). The orthodontist can decide whether your child does indeed need braces and which devices would be best.

There’s no set age for a child’s first orthodontist visit — some kids go when they’re 6, some kids go when they’re 10, and some go while they’re teens. Even adults can need orthodontic treatment. Many orthodontists say kids should see an orthodontist once their permanent teeth start coming in, around age 7. At this age, issues such as uneven bite and overcrowding will become apparent.

Starting the process early doesn’t mean a child will get braces right away. It just means the orthodontist will be able to find problems and decide the best time to start treatment.

Read more

What to Do if Your Child Is Being Bullied

What to Do if Your Child Is Being Bullied

No parent likes to think about their child being bullied or, even worse, being a bully but the fact is, more than half of all children are involved – either as a perpetrator, victim or witness. So, there’s a good chance you’ll have to deal with it at some point. If your child is being bullied there are things you can do to help them. Read more

peanut allergy

Peanut Allergy

What happens if my child has a peanut allergy?

If your child has a peanut allergy, her immune system will react after she’s eaten peanuts, because it wrongly sees this food as a threat.

Allergic reactions to peanuts are often mild, but can sometimes cause a severe reaction called anaphylaxis, which can be life-threatening. So it’s understandable that parents worry if their child is diagnosed with a peanut allergy. Read more

4 Shocking Ways Sugar Affects Your Kid’s Health

4 Shocking Ways Sugar Affects Your Kid’s Health

Ice cream, birthday cake and cookies are typical treats in our kids’ diets, but did you know that 16 percent of children and teens’ daily calories come from added sugar?

It’s no surprise that too much sugar can cause tooth decay, hyperactivity and increase the risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Yet experts say parents have no idea that all that sugar can also cause other chronic— albeit avoidable —health problems. Read more

How to Keep Your Baby Healthy This Winter

How to Keep Your Baby Healthy This Winter

How can I keep my baby from getting sick this winter?

Good question, since as sure as the mercury drops, cold and flu viruses make the rounds through homes and daycare facilities each year. If only there were a way to guarantee that your baby won’t get sick. Is there?

“Not really,” says Paul Offit, chief of infectious diseases at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Many common winter viruses are airborne, so if your baby takes a breath within, say, 4 to 6 feet of someone who’s sick, he can easily catch the bug himself. Read more